About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
CSPAN 66
LANGUAGE
English 66
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)
concept want to talk about is simply this -- america is not the federal government. [applause] take time to let that thought releasing in. america is not the federal government. in fact, america is not much about government at all. america's government is one of those things that you have to have but you sure don't want to much of it. it is like your family visiting over the holidays. i've got to be careful, my wife is here. this is the polar opposite of the political debate in our country today we've got one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government's of they can expand and another party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can get it under control. i am here to tell you that as a terrible debate. it is a debate fought entirely on our opponents terms, a debate about which party can better manage the federal government is a small and shortsighted debate. if our vision is not bigger than that, we simply don't deserve to win. our public discourse today -- america is defined by government, by the latest grooves that occur in washington, d.c. if you l
prepared to offer and want municipal state and local government to come to you for? >> i will take it. for us and mr. roy said, the disaster is local. for our buildings local code. we need clarification on what is local code is. i will give you a specific example. usually the municipalities have a limit on the height of the buildings. with the house they look at the top of the roof, the mean height of the roof. they say a maximum 32 feet. the mat comes and says now he will go 8 feet higher because the previous storm was fine, but i want you to be higher. then it is 39 feet. your over the code. who wins? the owner does not. we do not know what to build. that needs to be finalized before they know what to build. on the municipal side, to resolve these issues, that is where most of our businesses have been stopped. other than the insurance companies and through the mat trickling down of the funds that they need, they may have the money, they do not have the code to build four. two items of a result. the money funding down and zoning building codes. >> in new orleans after katrina, there
concept i want to talk to is there. america is not the federal government. >> let that sink n. america is not the federal government. in america government is one of those things you have to have but you sure don't want too much of it. it's kind of like your family visiting over the holidays. i have to be careful about what i say about family. this is of course the opposite of the political debate in your country today. we have one party that wants to be in charge of the federal government so they can expand it. we've got one that wants to be in charge so they can get it under control. that's a terrible debate. it's a debate fought on our opponents terms. a debate about who can better manage the government is a small debate. if our vision isn't bigger than that we don't deserve to win. >> america is defined by government. if you were to land here from outer space or watch tv for a week or watch the news, you would co-come to the conclusion that washington is the hub of america which and what happens in washington is what drives and dick tates the success or failure of america. in addit
interruption to their national insurance contributions. after 13 years when the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the announcement this week of a single tear pension will finally deal with this great injustice? >> i think my honorable friend makes an important way. i think the single. pension is an excellent for. i think will have all parties support because it holds out the prospect in 2017 of having a basic state pension over 140 pounds rather than 107 pounds, taking millions of people out of the main set, giving them dignity in retirement, and particularly as he says, helping low-paid people suffer what people, and above all women who have not been able to necessarily a full pension and pass. i hope will have the support of everyone across the house. >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, kind of join the prime minister in paying tribute to sapper richard walker, 20 engineer regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. he showed the utmost courage and bravery, and all of us have thoughts with his family and friends. i also joined the prime minister i
, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has not dimmed and the recession has not diminished our thirst for innovation and our talent for technological growth. we are the most creative, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of th
have entrusted with the authority of government the spirit of wisdom, that there might be justice and peace in our land. when times are prosperous, let our hearts be thankful. in troubled times, do not let our trust in you fail. in your holy name we pray. amen.>> amen. >> as we join our prayers with those of the people across the nation, so we say, each in our own language, the prayer that jesus taught us. our father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. give us this day, our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. for thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever and ever. amen.♪ [singing "america the o beautiful for spacious skies ♪ ♪ america, america ♪ ♪ [organ music playing] ♪ ♪ america! america! god shed his grace on thee ♪ >> the lord. bless you and keep you. >> the holy one made god's face to shine upon you. and be gracious unto you. >> the lord, lift up his countenance upon yo
. it is also about making long- term arguments about what government has done. all too often, not just our candidates but people on the front lines often find our content with the talking points. the clinton problem is that it's a political problem. -- cocoon problem is not just a political problem. how to reengage more -- people in this room in impacting this argument. creating a space where politicians are more comfortable doing it. >> one challenge that we have with appealing to women voters, i think it is also true of men who are -- who only have a high school diploma are have trouble finding a good job. and obama's america, we are all having trouble finding a good job. [laughter] women think that when they are voting for democrats they are voting for security. single women, many of whom have children and who feel quite vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might around in their own lives -- might go wrong in their own lives. they want that safety net. it is not an easy sell, but we have to make the case that what you think is security is not. because,
terrorism. on tuesday, his government sacked 5600 troops. why is it, is this such kept into what the prime minister said and what the prime minister does? >> i think the honorable gentleman as an important question and i do not deny for one second that we've had to take difficult decisions about defense spending in our country. but let me make this point. at 33 billion pounds a year we have the fourth largest defense budget anywhere in the world, and i think it is her important that we make sure we have the right scale and shape of our forces and they have the right capabilities. that is what in the defense review we are investing in drones, special forces, investing more in key and intelligence capabilities making sure that we also have the aircraft we need to make sure we have highly mobile armed forces. i am incredibly proud of what our armed forces do, and because we are balancing their budgets to will be better equipped for the future. >> sixty-eight years ago this sunday than not see concentration and extermination camps auschwitz was liberated. as we mark holocaust memorial day, wil
and the government can be prohibitive at times. well we have done is we try to focus our investments on technology. technology makes sense -- may be expensive but if you look at the total cost, it significantly reduces the overall cost. if you have an $80,000 cancer drug regimen that only works in 25% of patients, if we want a $100,000 test to take the 80% that cannot receive benefits, not only do we spare the patient the side effects, we save health care about the cost. the obama administration a few years ago used t o -- to quote data. about $25 billion had no impact on the patient. if we spent $3 billion in these test capabilities, you save health care costs. we are looking at these game changing technologies to improve the overall cost of health care. the beauty of these is it is the essence of personalized medicine. if we can more effectively take your dna and identify the nuances of your specific disease, which cannot practice trial and error madison -- medicine. it is hundreds of billions of dollars wasted on trial and error madison. more specific approaches treating disease at the individu
as online -- send us a tweet by typing @c spanwj. state and local governments are on their best financial shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is ed
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
-- you want to shut down the government, have at it. i was here when it happened before. you'll find all your constituents up close and personal. you'll get to know them. that's a lot different. that's a lot different action. you want to go off just ration, you don't like the cuts -- sequestration, you don't like the cuts, fine. you told the american people with your votes, you're prepared to have sequestration if we didn't do the job. so you got a lot of tough votes to make. don't try to avoid them by holding the credit worthiness of the united states at risk. it has got to stop and it should stop today on the floor of the house of representatives which says to the world, we are prepared to have this country pay the bills, the debts that were incurred by this action. it's got to stop today with a no vote against this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: thank you very much, mr. speaker. as always, this floor is open to people who have ideas. i'd like to say to the american people and to my colleagues that are listening, republican leadership has
to the honorable member that the use of food banks increased 10 times under the last labour government. >> will be prime minister join me in paying tribute to all the athletes who took part in the british -- held in my constituency? will be prime minister encourage people to register which will help us save lives of? >> i certainly could be to all those who took part in the british transplant games into the many volunteers who made these games such a success. i think gillian did a fantastic job in hosting the games. is quite right to raise this issue. they are a testament to the benefit of transplantation and i would encourage people to do as he says. >> seventy-seven of our young people with the most complex special needs face being without places next year because of government cuts. why should the most vulnerable young people in my constituency pay the price for his economic failures? >> first of all let me make the point to the honorable lady that the recent were having to make cuts is because of the mess left by her government. no one wants have to make the difficult decisions we'
an opportunity. it starts with public education. >> how many total years have you worked in government? >> a lot. since 1981, really. i was a civil rights attorney. i dealt with gender discrimination. a disability rights law had just come into law not long before i had joined. that was very good experience that led to my next government job with bob dole, 1981. the senate turned republican. at the top of the list was the voters' rights. he wanted to make sure he was a player. it was a good fit. >> did you agree with him in most things? >> i did. people tend to identify me with the progressive camp. i hate labels. i have taken strong stances. i am a conservative in one sense. i believe in capitalism but believe that system has to be policed and regulated. it is popular. i think it is one that was reflective of both politics. the tax reform act. i enabled it to be lower for everyone. the compromise that fixed social security for years. a benefit to cut and tax increases. that was bipartisan leadership that we needed and had. his service to our country and the terrible wounds he suffered gave him a
continuing resolutions to fund the government forever is unsustainable. you need to pass a budget to begin with a foundation. >> mr. cole, i also talked to attorneys, our attorneys, some other attorneys, not just on our staff and i tell them, talk to me like i can understand you. because they talk too much legal lease. i ask them, if i get a paycheck in my account every month and i don't get that paycheck in my account, so whenever it may come, at the end of the year, that's varying. their opinion, that could be. they didn't say it was. they said it could be that could violate the 27th amendment because they're varyingnot coming this month. coming at the end of the year. the other thing i would like to -- don't understand -- and i want to tell you like i think and how it is. we are kind of like trying to not punish but penalize the other side. the senate. because they haven't acted. so what we're doing is drafting legislation that's going to make our side, whether we pass or maybe sometimes not pass a budget, and we're going to punish, not punish. maybe penalize our side by not getting a p
are the umbrella for so many other agencies in our government. if we were not there, many of those agencies representatives -- agencies' representatives would have a difficult time being there. we are the diplomatic presence that permits us to pursue law enforcement objectives, intelligence objectives, military objectives, and so much more. so it's not just about us sitting around and say, you know, do we really want our diplomats at risk? it's ok, what are the equities of the rest of the government that would be effective if we decided we had to close shop because the risk was too great? i want to stress that because i don't think you can understand, at least from my perspective, how difficult the calculation is without knowing that it's not just about the state department and usaid. secondly, i don't think we can retreat from these hard places. we have to harden our security presence but we can't retreat. we've got to be there. we've got to be picking up intelligence information, building relationships and if we had a whole table of some of our most experienced ambassadors sitting here to
of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following individuals to serve as the governing board of the office of congressional ethics. the clerk: nominated by the speaker with the concurrence of the minority leader -- mr. porter j. goss, mr. egan, ms. hayward, mr. friendswood. nominated by the minority leader with the concurrence of the speaker -- mr. david scaggs of colorado, co-chairman. mrs. yvonne burke of california. ms. karen english of arizona. mr. mike barnes of maryland,ality -- alternate. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house -- the chair will now entertain requests for one-minutes. please take your conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania deserves to be heard. please take your convers
of tripartheid branches that notably do not have enough power to govern alone. madisonian austin. or four congresses have been the worst in the history of united states of the total abandonment of the check and balance. fact he is by letting court liberal and democratic values. the republicans took that same position under bush says they are silent. the result is, we have now check on that authority. to make matters worse, the court system has largely been taken offline. when president obama said that he can define whether something is a war and therefore circumvent congress and intervene in the libyan civil about intervening in syria -- i went to the core with members of congress and the challenge a democrat and republican and these are the good members. we said you are circumventing a clear requirement of the constitution. we could not get a hearing because the courts of limited standing, as it is called. there are now many constitutional violations that cannot be subject to judicial review because no one has standing. we have a latent violations of the constitution and we literally can
it together as a government, a community, as a state. in 2013, let us honor one another. our renewed community. let us honor those we have lost. we have a great deal of work to do. but if history is any judge, we will rise to the occasion. when called upon, we will answer as we have done time and time again. as one people, one community, and one connecticut. [applause] as we begin our work which will take many months, may god bless each and every one of you. madoff last the great state of connecticut and the united states of america. -- may god bless the creek state of connecticut, and the united states of america. [applause] >> on c-span2 night, house speaker john boehner and house republicans discussed federal spending in the national debt. then the house rules committee. a house ways and means committee and why he thinks the debate should be different -- separate from the talks. house speaker john boehner and other house republicans briefed reporters on a vote on the debt ceiling. the house will vote wednesday on a measure that will occur -- extend the debt limit until may 19. included is a
and not the government, which is what obama believes is the demint -- the definition of the collectivity. if all that is true, and i think it is, i think that four more years are on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private-sector and will have results that will be unsustainable and there will be a shift away from it, which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term, although i'm not that optimistic about the short-term. >> we will build more into the causes, the selection -- this may be a false choice, but to what extent you think the outcome had to do with romney s weaknesses as a candidate and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and the stillness of it, how much the circumstances the economy was unable to brand obama. >> the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a set -- was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the intrusiveness expansion of the pyramid. it was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and there
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
of the government. >> do you have any concept of the number of american troops it might have take ton actually create a totally secure environment for him in benghazi on september 10 and 11? >> no. the number of diplomatic security personnel requested in the cables is five. there were five there that night. with him. plus there was a mutual understanding with the annex that had a much more heavily armed presence because of the work they were doing in the region. it is very difficult to, in retrospect, to really anticipate what might have been. one of the r.s.o.'s who had served in libya said the kind of attack the compound suffered had not been anticipated. we had gotten used to preparing for car bombs and suicide bombings and things like that but this was of a different nature. and we even saw that at the annex, which was much more heavily fort fid, had much more heavy military equipment, we lost two of our best and had one of our diplomatic security officers badly injured. he's still at walter reed. so even the annex which had more assets in the face of the attack was suffering losses that n
engagement and parts of the world but are struggling to build new governments. it underscores the real courage of the unsung women who put their lives at risk. i respect what you have done. this is a reflection of your leadership as well as your patriotism. your candor has been a trademark of your service as secretary of state. i believe every member has welcomed your openness and cooperation. your letter of december 18 was appreciated by members of both sides as another example of the openness. we share your mission here today. we look forward to a constructive dialogue to learn from the events that occurred in benghazi and to design policies that better protect the women serving in d.c. they lost their lives on september 11, 2012 during terrorist attacks on a special mission. we honor their service to our nation. we grieve with their families. the result to take specific actions to prevent future incidents as. we not be able to prevent every single attack in the future. we must make sure our employees are capable of standing up such an attack. they have embraced this. we will hear mo
if we recognize the new somaly government which could never have been possible out -- without the support, the u.n. was strongly behind it, we got other nations to invest. what we're looking at in west africa is to try to help support an african a.u. supported troop combination from a number of countries to really take the lead against the terrorists in northern mali. . this is hard. if the united states comes in and does something on her own, nobody can match us in military assets and prowess, but a lot of the challenges we face are not immediately or sustainbly solved by military action alone, therefore, we have to get countries in the region to increase their border security and increase their counterterrorist efforts inside their own boards. we have a lot to do now in west africa. so i think you're right to point out, the united states has to play a role, but it needs to be part of a multi lateral effort in order to have a chance at success. >> thank you, madam secretary. we have discussed many important issues. i remain concerned about whether the accountability review bo
government and the libyan government. i saw firsthand what is called, timely and exceptional coordination. no delays in decision making. no denials of support from washington or our military. i want to echo the review board praise for the valor and courage of the people on the ground, especially the security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. american lives were saved in real time. the next morning, i told the american people that heavily armed militants -- i stood with president obama as he spoke about an act of terror. it is important to recall in that same time period, we were seeing violent attacks in cairo, as well as large protests outside many other posts, where thousands of our diplomats served. so i immediately ordered a review of our security posture around the world, with particular scrutiny for high- threat posts. and i asked the department of defense to join interagency security assessment teams and to dispatch hundreds of additional marine security guards. i named the first deputy assistant secretary of state for high threat posts so that missions in dangerous places get
to start governing from a con seventive perspective. and i don't know what everybody else said about the deal we're going to do tomorrow but i'm actually ok with what leadership is doing right now because they actually have an agenda. the agenda is to get to balance in 10 years, to have a balanced budge, not just to pass a budget that balances in 10 year bus to actually achieve balance in 10 years. if you look at what we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to
that the government should not be entangled in this. in other words, taxpayer money should not be going for the provision of abortion. that's one bit of good news. the second bit of good news is, i think, again, those of us who have been here a little while, who have been in these trenches trying to beg and plead for an increase of awareness as to what the consequences of abortion are, young people are recognizing that, again, there's got to be a better way. they've lived with this through their generation. they've seen the scars, seen the wounds, seen the effects on society and they're coming forward and saying women deserve better. can't we be loving enough, can't we be big enough to do something different here? and i think that's a great sign of encouragement for two reasons. one is projecting forward, maybe we can reshape society. but also heal the wounds that have already occurred. because they are substantive indeed. and i think it's important, and young people, i believe, recognize this. they're there saying, don't make this choice. it's a false choice. particularly if you feel c
of the individuals and from the strength of civil society and not the government, which is what obama leaves -- believes is the objection of connectivity. if all of that is true, which i think it is, then i think four more years on the course of drift, on the course of expanding the government at the expense of the private sector will have results that will be unmistakable and there will be a shift away from it which makes me rather optimistic about the future in the medium term though i'm not that optimistic about the short term. >> let's delve into more of the causes of it, the election result, and this may be a false choice, but to what extent do you think the outcome had to do with romney's weaknesses as an anecdote and how much had to do with the content he was trying to sell and perhaps the staleness of it, how much was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look a
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
to that u.s. for training. there were some who led the military coup, which overthrew the elected government. that is worrisome for us. we asked ourselves questions. did we miss the signs that this was happening? was there anything that we did in our training that was -- that could have been done differently and caused a different outcome? i think that the answer is a little bit of both. as we look at this from a purely military standpoint, we were focusing our training almost exclusively on tactical or technical matters. how to operate various pieces of equipment and how to improve effectiveness or tactical operations and the like. i see that there kernel is a paratrooper. -- colonel is a paratrooper. all of those things are very good. we did spend the requisite time focusing on values, ethics, and a military egos that says -- e cos that says when you put on aim u of the nation, you accept responsibility to defend and th protect that nation and abide by the legitimate authority that has been established duri an conductor sells to the rule of law and to see yourself as servants of people of
government does not recognize your marriage and your partner cannot get social security benefits. if you are a federal employee, your spouse will not get your pension benefits, date and will not get health insurance, your children may not get health insurance. there are real life harm's every day from the defense of marriage act. we maintain that the defense of marriage act is unconstitutional. i certainly hope that the supreme court will find it so. line.miami, democrats' caller: good morning. my question to you is had you seen a lot of transgendered married with heterosexuals? what is the point of it, then? guest: well, i think transgendered people have always gotten married. some transgendered people are straight, some transgendered people are gay. the ones who are straight are allowed to marry in some places, the ones who are gay are only allowed to marry in states i mentioned already. again, i am not sure by how anyone else's marriage or life is impacted in any bad way if people are allowed to make commitments to the person they glove and strengthen their family -- they love and str
, but they have been working off a continuing resolution which funds the government for certain amount of time. it will end on march 27. house leaders tried to put forward or sketched out a game plan for how they would handle things going forward. the first step in all this is the vote today on a short-term debt limit extension. host: seth, you mentioned the republican retreat last week and on conversations with conservatives, an event on capitol hill yesterday. what kind of dissent did you hear from conservative republicans on the debt ceiling vote? guest: they want to make sure that they get some sort of deficit reduction out of this. i think it makes them a little nervous. this is what many will referred to as a clean vote on the debt ceiling, if they're not a lot of strings attached. they would like to see more deficit reduction. i think they are a little weary that leadership will follow through on their promises. so it is within that vein. i guess i would say that conservative lawmakers, at least the most conservative, wants to be cautiously optimistic that house leaders might follow thr
their position in society, sometimes government, sometimes military might and they were terrified of the shia, which was going to be dominant in the future. you had this combination of factors that was fear of the future, frustration against foreign invaders, and then -- not as much religious extremism as sometimes is perceived. it was not really an al qaeda religious movement. it was a political movement, but he got leveraged by some very clever work by people like abu musab al-zarqawi. we were very sure he was there at the beginning of early 2004. we started to track his work. in the spring of 2004, when falluja became the first spot in the country where they held ground -- they actually, al qaeda and the sunni, elements working with them at that hope oh -- point, held at bay the forces for a couple of months. it was pure what they had built was not only thoroughly passionate, but it was also extensive. zarqawi was an interesting role. to get to the heart of the question, there was a question about -- an issue about did he really matter. the answer is yes, he did. he mattered in a big way.
, expansive government." the chairwoman of the house republican conference said "the president's out word words must be matched with actions regarding the country's fiscal health," suggesting a gulf between the two." good morning, your thoughts on the inaugural address? caller: i thought that it was wonderful. i thought that the speech was very insightful. the keylieve that's words were we the people. together we will do all the things we set out to do. host: he talked about preserving medicare, social security. he talked about climate change, equal rights for gay couples and women. is that your priority list? caller: maybe not in that order, but the president has a hard job and congress has got to work together with him. i believe that we have good republicans. many people in the country believed in the position of the president and that the congress will go along, eventually. host: all right, douglas. your priority list? top five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on
that like many departments throughout government has numbers of challenges. we saw systemic issues that need to be addressed and they're in the process of being addressed right now. our nation has budgetary constraints which means that in all of these departments creativity is going to have to be utilized to make sure we make the most of what we have in making sure that our u.s. interests are put forth. we have a world that is a dangerous world, and things continue to come over the area. sometimes at surprising times. i know as secretary of state, you are going to have to lead our country in addressing those as they come about. i do hope that you'll work closely with this committee, as you've work very closely with this committee over the last many years, in helping us work with you to make sure that as we move ahead we move ahead together and that it's seamless. we have many challenges, and i know on monday president obama said that america will remain the anchor of strong challenges in every corner of the globe. we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crises abr
what i am concerned about. it was not saying there is absolutely no role for government. these people have to pull themselves up by the bootstraps. i think we can do more and more of telling those stories with a places like national review. we have to highlight the things that work. when people see it, it makes a huge difference as opposed to sterile principle or policy that we may know sounds good, but we want to feel good about it. >> there are two was to message to people, whether they are consumers, voters, your neighbors. shock the conscience is pretty obvious. we always have to have our hair and hands on fire when we talk about something. does not always have to be an anti obama statement. i actually prefer to ignore him more than anything. one day i will wake up and he will not be president. i can spend time with people who are useful to advancing the ideas and the belief systems that we have in free market and religious liberties and limited government and the family etc.. what about the warm the heart? that is really important. people say, that will not move of
. with the government also help, but have still been putting some up -- with the government's help, they have still been putting some up. certainly it is a huge thing that should not be going forward. >> $90 billion a year, that is what you and peter to make, right? [laughter] a lot of people think that we need government policy to guide this stuff. to be fair to boone pickens, but he was arguing for was the federal mandate that commercial vehicles had to use gas and would provide subsidies to switch the engine over. that is not terribly different from what barack obama thinks about, with using solar batteries. happy dreams and unicorns stre. do we need guidance from the department of energy or any sort of federal policy? can the market take care of it on its own? >> it ought to be decided in the marketplace. a lot of this takes a long time. horizontal drilling took 20, 30 years. the time it takes to produce confirmations. it ought to be decided in the marketplace. everybody converting over too cheap, natural gas for their cars? the fact is that it is not always going to be cheap. once people start payi
brownback, bob jindal, that is where you alcee conservative principles govern. in washington, a half to boast -- both oppose the obama administration, collaborate, and in the house, they have to figure out what it means to the beat -- to be the majority of one body of congress while the presidency and other house and congress is held by the other party. >> in the last five elections, in four of the 5, republicans have not had a majority of votes. even though george w. bush served two terms, he did not get a majority in 2000 and barely got one in 2004? >> i'm not one to minimize the danger and challenge of the republican party. losing 25 senate seats this year -- president obama only got 51% of the vote. the economy is looking great. a lot of democratic incumbents looked people ribble. the senate cannot be gerrymandered. it looked like a clean a snapshot of the country. for republicans to win 8 waterboarded -- while democrats one -- republicans will 8 and democrats won 25, that is dangerous. we need to figure out what went wrong in 2012. i'm not for endless naval gazing. there are ple
, a government of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed. and for more than two hundred years, we have. through blood drawn by lash and blood drawn by sword, we learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half- slave and half-free. we made ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together. together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play. together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortune. through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiative and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constants in our character.
personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in the good that america can do in the world. he has seen its and he has lived all his life. from since the marshall plan in action with his father, to volunteering to serve in the military and traveling all these years as a senator. america is and acc
in on that question and see what the federal government can do to improve our ability to determine who needs help and our ability to identify the person or agency whose job it is to provide the help, and then we will have provided some service. it helps to put a face on who needs help. as a former governor, i look at things from my background and perspective, as i know most of us do. about 22% of tennesseeans reported having a mental illness last year. that is more than 1 million people. this is according to our state department of mental health. about 5% had a severe mental illness. that is nearly 250,000 tennesseeans. that is a lot of people. about 40,000 had a major depressive episode. the funding that helps meet the needs for that comes in some part from the federal government. about 22% of what tennessee spends, i'm told, is federal dollars. the rest is state dollars. in community services, state appropriations are about 70% of the mental health fund. while the state government has a role, it is a support role, and it ought to make things easier instead of harder. in preparing for this, it s
of their surviving -- [inaudible] >> what this government has done is, first of all,tive the biggest -- give the biggest increase in the state pension of five pounds, 30 last year. we've kept the cold weather payments at the high level, and we're replacing the warm front scheme, and while that helps something like 80,000 houses a year, the eco could help up to 230,000 houses a year. that is what we're doing, and it's a record we should be proud of. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the prime minister should know that the ons have recently released figures that show there were 24,000 extra cold weather deaths over the winter of 2010-2012. the majority of those who perished were over the age of 75. so, mr. speaker, can i ask the prime minister if he thinkshis governnt should do more to help the elderly and the vulnerable and less to help millionaires with tax cuts? >> as i just said, we are doing more to help elderly and the vulnerable. a record state increase, bigger than what the party opposite would have done keeping cold weather payments at the higher level that the last
that is expressed in this legislation is the fact that our federal government has gone without a budget for almost four years. it is that the senate -- yes, your party is in control of the budget -- the senate has chosen not -- >> we are talking about raising the debt limit here. we are not talking about the budget. >> that's what this legislation does. >> all right. you've done that. >> and this legislation is authored by a democrat here in the house. >> the fact of the matter is that there has been no regular order on this, and we've gotten used to -- we went through plan b. there was no regular order on that and you know how that turned out. you remember -- >> are you talking about the fiscal cliff? >> on the fiscal cliff. >> there are other plan b's but i understand -- >> there are a lot of plan b's. i just want to know which one you are talking about. >> let me reiterate that we would be more than happy to join in your process here. maybe even give you a great idea every now and then. maybe something we can all work together on. once again, the house of representatives would be the people's h
that we had a conservative government after the next election, they will have their say and referendum on europe, but if we do not have a conservative government, we will not have a referendum? >> my honorable friend makes a good point. i believe is right to resettle our relationship with europe to make it more open, more competitive and more flexible, to make us feel more comfortable inside the union, and then to give the british people the referendum they deserve. >> can the prime minister confirm that 3.4 million families with someone who is disabled will be worse off as a result of his benefit uprating cap? why is he making more difficult for these families? >> first, i would say to the honorable lady that disability living allowance is not included in the cap. disability living allowance is not related to people's income. it is actually related to people's needs. if we look as a whole at what we're doing with disability living allowance and the personal independents payment, we see that the overall amount of money we're spending on disability is going to go up and k
on the table. >> i have often wondered and explored this if people have an appetite for limited government? americans in general, the government keeps getting bigger. we struggle to obtain the a slower right of growth, which is a great vibtry in a way it is. have you found an appetite for limited government? or limited government for others and not for themselves? >> i believe so. i said often times in the campaign trail that the constitution is very popular and big government is not popular. that is where we should anchor our program and policies. you saw this in the president's speech on monday even though it was a very liberal speech. he didn't call for big government. >> the inaugural address? >> yeah, the inaugural address. that's because he knows what bill clinton knew in 1996, that big government is over. so i do think -- >> the era is over. >> yeah. again, if political leaders will explain the circumstances and choices that we face and make the case for limited government, free market economics and constitutionalism the americans will side with those principles and they always have
of their surviving -- [inaudible] >> what this government has done is pre-k's first of all give the biggest increase. we have kept the cold weather payments at the highest level. we are replacing with the energy -- and help something like 80,000 houses a year, this new plan could help up to 230 thousand houses. that is what we are doing. it is a record we should be proud of. >> 90 mr. speaker. and prime minister should know that the os of recently released figures, 24,000 cold- weather deaths, the majority of those who perished were over the age of 75. does he think his government should do more to help the elderly and vulnerable and less to help millionaires with tax cut question mark >> we are doing more to help the elderly. a record increase in the basic state pension. bigger than what the party opposite would have done with their roles. keeping the cold weather payments at the higher level. the last rt only introduced before the election. keeping our promise. taking all of those steps and making sure that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest. that is a reco
's important first to get the fiscal house in order. the time to do it is while we have divided government. the time to do it is while the president is at the peak of his popularity. the time to do it is while the house of representatives, the republican house has created a window of two or three months to deal with all the fiscal issues. and the time to do it is after two years of discussion of republicans and democrats in a bipartisan way about the need to fix the debt and the importance of it for the country. so my hope is that as the president and his advisors look at the united states senate, they see, number one, a willingness to solve a problem of fixing the debt in a bipartisan way. i get the feeling they don't believe that about us. i don't know what else we can do to cause them to believe that. there is not the same kind of comfortable relationship back and forth that there should be. i've heard some people say well, the johnson-dirksen days, that was ancient history. that is ancient history. that was a long time ago. but madam president, human nature doesn't change. human nature
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)